Rise of Neurocinema: Reading Brainwaves to Win Awards

In this article we will explore the use of neuroscience and its application to enhance the film experience. Princeton University psychology professor Uri Hassan coined the tern “neurocinematics” that examine the brainwaves and affects on films.

Many firms and studios are start to examine using neurocinema as part of way to create blockbuster hits and award winning movies. Stephen Susco who wrote the movie Grudge, says that its growth is a “natural evolution of major studios trying to maximize profit while making the early creative development, script and storytelling process more scientific as opposed to just based on experience an instinct.”

There are other filmmakers who believe neurocinema can be bad for the film industry. Peter Katz told Fast Company that focus groups “dont really know or can’t articulate or even remember how they fell about a movie or scene.”

James Cameron, director of the movie Avatar, was one of the first to discuss the importance of neuroscience research in film. He states, ” a functional-MRI study of brain activity would show that more neurons are actively engaged in the processing a 3-D thna the same film seen in 2-D.”

There are neuromarketing firms that analyze brain response to a trailer scenes and sequences. The firm MindSign uses biometric devices to gather information about what a viewer sees in a trailer.

Expect neurocinema to be a bigger part of the Hollywood film industry.

Written by Kevin Randall

Article can be found on the link below.

http://www.fastcompany.com/1731055/rise-neurocinema-how-hollywood-studios-harness-your-brainwaves-win-oscars

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